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Surviving Cogworld

Author: John O'Brien

John O'Brien has watched and supported the development of some of the best and most inspiring support for people with intellectual disabilities in Wisconsin, over many years. Today those supports feel threatened as major organisational change is leading to the merging of systems for older people with systems for people with intellectual disabilities.

However this is not just a local issue. All over the world systems of care and support are becoming increasingly commodified, regulated and mechanised - they are becoming part of cogworld. 

This is despite the fact that common-sense and experience tell us that good support has nothing to do with these mechanical processes:

Good support is not an accident and it cannot be bought for money. Good support engages whole people in each other’s lives. It calls on the capacities of people’s hearts, their practical thinking and their capacities for action.

In this important paper John reflects on the nature of cogworld and what we can do to stop it from growing.


The publisher is Developmental Disabilities Network.

Surviving Cogworld © John O'Brien 2015.

All Rights Reserved. No part of this paper may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher except for the quotation of brief passages in reviews.

Documents

Library

Open Letter on Regulation

Open Letter on Regulation

An Open Letter to David Behan (Head of Regulation) and Norman Lamb (lead politician) on the danger of relying on regulation to keep people safe.

Regulation

Regulation

Bob Rhodes and Richard Davis explore the damaging impact that regulatory systems can have on intentional communities.

Basic Tasks for Service Providers

Basic Tasks for Service Providers

John O'Brien sets out the basic skills service providers need in order to successfully support people who are at risk of social exclusion or devaluation.

It's a Cogworld

It's a Cogworld

Peter Leidy sings, inspired by conversations with John O'Brien and members of Wisconsin's Developmental Disabilities network about the dangers of bureaucracy.