Menu

Cash Not Care

The planned demolition of the UK welfare state

Author: Mo Stewart

Mo Stewart is a former healthcare professional, a disabled female veteran and an independent researcher.

Stewart's book documents the impact of the enforced austerity measures of the UK government, as they negatively affect the welfare and the survival of the chronically sick and disabled population in receipt of welfare benefits when unfit to work.

This research has informed welfare reform debates in the House of Lords and the House of Commons since 2011 and contributed to the evidence used by the United Nations to investigate the UK government for breaches of the Human Rights of sick and disabled people.

Endorsed by the disabled community and by academics, Stewart's research has identified the adoption of lethal social policies, copied from American social security policies, and linked to the death of thousands of the most vulnerable of all, as the UK welfare state is systematically demolished as all planned over thirty years ago by a previous Conservative government.

“Cash Not Care will make you feel angry, sad and inspired in equal measures. This is a book that needs to be widely read and talked about.”

Dr Kayleigh Garthwaite, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Centre for Health and Inequalities Research, the University of Durham

“Government is entitled to ensure that benefits are given to those with a genuine entitlement and to assess people. But the process must be professional and honest. In this book Mo Stewart peels back the layers of deception, and the confused thinking that underpins the destruction of social support for disabled peopleā€¦ Some of those assessed as fit for work died just afterwards. Others died later and some committed suicide. Stewart names names. She shows where and how the policies originated. She destroys all claims that they were based on solid research. To understand what is happening and why, this is the book to read and I thank Mo Stewart for writing it.”

Sir Bert Massie CBE, DL, Chair, Disability Rights Commission 2000-2007